Internet: Website Design: Top 10 Mistakes

Before I talk about the gallery pages on your website I thought I should talk about the mistakes I’ve seen on artists websites. I want to be sure that you will develop THE most exciting and professional website possible. Your website says so much about you and is there to speak for you 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. It’s the world wide web after all and a poorly designed website says so much about you.

1. Not including an artist statement, bio and resume.
Visitors will go to your work, first and foremost, to see your art but a well written artist statement, bio and resume will make the difference between making a sale and not making a sale. Between getting an exhibition and not getting that exhibition. It shows how in touch with your process you are, your experience and your professionalism.

2. Not including contact information or including too much contact information.
If there is no way for people to contact you how will you receive any opportunities. That said putting your address on your website (or anywhere on the internet for that matter) is opening yourself up for identity theft and perhaps something worse. Also putting a landline phone number is a bad idea. If you put your phone number into a search engine your name and address might come up. Try it on Yahoo in particular. With that information someone can start opening bank accounts, getting credit cards, etc. in your name. So put access to an email and a cell phone number only. You can also put links to your Social Networking profiles.

3. Not putting links to other websites
Search engines will give you better ranking if you link your website to another website and they, in turn, link back to you. Make sure that these links are relevant to your work and that they have high search engine ranking. A link to your dentist is fine but does it really have anything to do with your work?

4. Not Meta-tagging Your Website
This means that you will choose 8 key words that will help search engine spiders categorize your website. If you don’t’ do this they will go by the content of the text on your page and that will make they come up with something totally garbled. There is also a two sentence description that is a tag. You can see what that is in a previous post with a glossary of terms.

5. Letting your website developer handle the whole entire thing, even the design.
A website designer, in most cases, is not a graphic designer. If they are, they may not know the ins and outs of the art world. What makes a professional website. That’s entirely up to you. Before you even think of approaching a designer please, please, please take the time to plan your website. I can help you do that through an internet consultation. Visit the website for more information: http://www.theartistobjective.com I can do it over the phone or in person with internet support.

6. Putting up a website and leaving it static.
In order for a website to be effective it has to be live. Meaning lively and constantly changing. Put new photos, articles, exhibition information and events. If you can’t do it yourself have your website designer do it for you. This can be costly. The Artists Objective has a monthly website update program. For more information: http://www.theartistobjective.com

7. Confusing Navigation/Menus
This runs the gamete from poor placement, to type that’s too small, to confusing categories. The number one mistake here is categorizing by the year. To me this is a huge cop out and I’m inclined to leave the website. I feel that it’s too exclusive for me, and that I might have had to know about the artist in the first place in order to be privileged enough to visit the website. I know that’s not what the artist intended but it’s the lazy way out. Describe your art by medium, or subject. You can do drop down menus (technically known as jump or pop up menus). Think carefully about this because it generates hits/clicks which boosts your rating on search engines.

8. Poor Navigation on the Gallery Pages
I will talk more in the next post about how to set up the gallery pages but you will want a way for people to click from one enlarged image to the next without having to go back to an interim page. That’s annoying to your visitor and they may leave after the first click.

9. Small Images or Images that Don’t Enlarge.
When I visit a website I want a comprehensive look at the art. That’s the first and foremost reason I am there. I not only want to see the work, I want to LIVE in it. I want to feel it and almost touch it.. I want to feel compelled to touch my computer screen. Images that are too small do not allow me to do that. In fact, it almost screams ameture. Images must be 72 dpi and I like to recommend a minimum of 350 pixels. but ideal is 504 which is 7 inches. I always try for that but if it’s not possible that’s okay too. Be sure that it also works on a smaller screen, like an iPad or an iPhone.

10. Poorly Photographed Images
When I see this I sigh. Why did the artist spend the time and the money to put up a website in the first place? I can understand if an artist is using interference or iridescent colors but there is a way. Your images must be 100% perfect! In today’s digital world there is no excuse. See the first posts on this blog fore more about photographing your art properly. Please don’t put up a website until you have good photos.

A bonus mistake – too many bells and whistles or colors that are so bright that they interfere with the art itself. Your art is fantastic! Make it shine on the internet and everywhere else that you present it. Let planning your website be a way for you to develop a “look” for all of your materials. Your blog, postcard, brochures, stationary, etc.

That said The Artists Objective does website design and internet consultations. Please visit the website for more information: http://www.theartistobjective.com In the next post I will address the gallery pages. Stay tuned!

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2 thoughts on “Internet: Website Design: Top 10 Mistakes

  1. This is really interesting, You’re a very skilled blogger. I have joined your feed and look forward to seeking more of your wonderful post. Also, I have shared your site in my social networks!

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