Email: What to Do if Your Email Has Been Hacked

No discussion of email would be complete without addressing the issue of hacking. This is when someone takes unauthorized control of your internet based account and starts doing unlawful things with it. Usually they send emails in your name. Sometimes those emails ask the recipients to click a link taking them to a website and enter information that allows the hacker to take control of your account.  They can get information that will allow them to go as far as sending similar emails to your contacts, identity theft or sending a virus that will shut down your computer. So beware.

WHAT TO DO IF YOUR ACCOUNT HAS BEEN HACKED

1. Make sure your security/anti-virus software is up to date.

2. Recover your account. Go to your account and try to log in. You will most certainly need to change your password because the hacker has changed it. You can do this by using the “Forgot My Password” feature and it will help you change your password.

3. Change all, and I do mean all, of the information that is associated with logging into your account. Your password, your security questions, your pin number if you have one. Changing your security questions, especially, will prevent the hacker from taking control of your account again.

4. Check your “Sent” box. This will allow you to see any mail that the hacker has sent to your contacts or anything that is unfamiliar. Delete those emails immediately.

5. Send an email to all of your contacts letting them know your email was hacked. If they see any strange emails from you not to open them and, most certainly, do not click any links in the email. Not only will this alert your contacts to the fact that your email has been hacked but it will alert the hacker that you’re on to them.

6. This final step is not necessary and it may be hard to find a way to do it but report that your account was hacked to the email or social networking platform you are using. This will allow them to investigate and perhaps prevent it from happening again.

PREVENTING HACKING
There are several steps you can take to prevent your account from being hacked.  You should make this part of your daily business practice of making art.

1. This one should be a no brainer but don’t ever, ever share your password with anyone and I do mean anyone. Even a trusted best friend or a family member. Yes you can trust them in just about anything but do you trust them to know exactly what to do with the information. Don’t take that chance.

2. Be on the lookout for Phishing attempts. No reputable company would ask you to change your password in an email. Not even a financial institution, an email company, a social networking company. They have built in ways of asking you to do that right on their websites. Do not even open suspicious emails, especially if they have an attachment – they could be SPAM.  If they contain a virus it will open up automatically and “infect” your computer.  Even if there is not an attachment there could be a virus.  Spammers who use commercial email services can see who opened their emails and what action they took – if any.

3. Keep anti-virus software up to date always. Hackers are discovering new ways to get in all the time. Anti-virus software companies are constantly on the lookout and finding new ways to prevent them just as fast.

4. Take extra precaution when using public computers – in a library or a cafe. Hackers can store something called Malware (which stands for Malicious Software) in public computers. This will allow them to capture all of your information. Please, please, please do not ever do any banking or financial work on a public computer or a computer that doesn’t belong to you. It is a sure fire way for someone suspicious to conduct identity theft.

5. If you are using your own laptop in a WiFi Hotspot – especially one that is not password protected – be cautious. Hackers can get into your computer through WiFi. I’ve even heard of cases where hackers drive around neighborhoods in cars looking for WiFi spots that aren’t password protected. If you are using a wireless modem make sure that it is password protected. Most modems are now coming with built in passwords so it’s not as much of an issue.

6. Never click on ads in search engines – especially if they say one thing and the domain address/URL says another. For Example: if you see an ad for Target, check the URL. If it doesn’t begin with http://www.target.com you know it’s not an official Target website.

7. Always sign out of your accounts, especially when you are in a public space. If you are doing financial work – like going on your bank’s website – don’t just log out of the account – quite the browser. Some people advise shutting down the entire computer but I’m not 100% sure of this. Again, please keep your financial work at home. Don’t go on your bank’s website in a public space.

CREATING STRONG PASSWORDS

1. Use 10 characters or more. 16 characters is ideal.

2. Do not use information that is close to you. Such as the name of a relative, pet, the year or city you live in. Use something that is not easy to guess.

3. Use a combination of uppercase and lowercase letters and punctuation. For example: iLWoprqba@9548.

COMPUTER SOFTWARE

Firewalls
Most computers come with a Firewall built in and/or it comes with anti-virus software. It’s a computer based program that protects your PC. It automatically monitors incoming and outgoing traffic to your computer as a virus preventative. It also prevents hackers or other people from seeing what you’re doing.  This is based on a set of precepts set either automatically by the software or by you.

Anti-Virus Software
This is software that you will have to purchase but it’s well worth the investment and it’s well worth it to take the time to update it when it asks you to. It repeatedly scans your computer for viruses and removes them when it’s detected. It will also prevent them from coming into your computer. The two best anti-virus software programs are McAfee and Norton Internet Security or Norton 360. Some Anti-Virus software will come with a Firewall for extra protection.

FROM THE HACKER’S PERSPECTIVE
Why would someone want to hack your email or your account?  What is the motivation behind it? The most common answer is simply for sport – to get a cheap thrill. It can also be for unlawful reasons – such as accessing bank accounts, identity theft or information gathering.  Hackers are usually sophisticated software programmers.  You can receive a legitimate looking email from a hacker.  It will come from a trusted email service provider or a company.  It may even have the logo and usual format from the company. Such as clothing1@target.com or info@paypal.com

Hackers usually send out a huge broadcast of emails, so they’re not just targeting you. They are looking for anyone who is uniformed enough to open the email and take action. Even just opening the email could cause a problem – a virus could open automatically onto your computer and do one of several things.

MALWARE/VIRUSES
The technical name for a virus is Malware (short for Malicious Software).  It is a general term for hostile or intrusive software.  In addition to the internet or email this can come from being in a Wifi Hotspot or a public computer.  The types of Malware that you may come across include: Worms, Trojan Horses, Ransomware, Spyware, Adware and Scareware.  Here are descriptions of the different types of Malware.

Worms
Software that spreads across a network of computers – without attaching itself to software or an email or an in company message.  It replicates automatically again and again and again.  This has been known to shut down entire companies or even sections of government.  Chances are that you are only on a network of one computer – yours – so you won’t have to worry too much about this one.

Trojan Horses
These are similar to Computer Worms but they don’t self replicate. Typically they are used to cause theft or loss of data and could possibly cause harm to your computer.

Ransomware
Malware that restricts access to the computer that it infects and demands a ransom to be paid to the creator in order for the restriction to be removed.  Some forms of Ransomware simply lock the system and display’s messages intended to coax the user into paying to get the computer working again.

Adware
This is exactly why you should avoid click ads on Search Engines.  It’s advertising supported software that will generate ads in your name.  When you click that ad in the Search Engine the hacker will gain access to your computer.  It will also generate revenue for the hacker.

Scareware
A virus that produces frivolous and alarming warnings and threat notices. They are most certainly fictitious or a useless Firewall or computer registry cleaner. It will also try to increase it’s perceived value by bombarding the user with constant warning messages.

I hope that by telling you about the different kinds of viruses it will send the message home that protecting your computer is key to your success and can save you thousands of dollars.  Sometimes computer stores will charge a ton of money just to recover files.  This is also why you should never leave anything on your computer’s hard drive.  Always use a Flash Drive/Memory Stick.

SOCIAL MEDIA HACKING
One more tip to prevent hacking on your Social Networking accounts.  Be a warm contact always.  This is good not just to prevent hacking but for your business.  A warm contact is someone that clicks like, comments and posts.  In other words, is active. Hackers are looking for cold contacts.  These are accounts that were set up and never touched again.  The hacker will take the same actions that they do on email with the exception that they may tag your contacts in photos you didn’t post, or post something on your timeline.

If you do find a friend who has been hacked inform them immediately and then unfriend them.  The hacker can access your account through them.  As soon as the person resolves the issue you can get back in touch with them.

If your Social Networking account has been hacked follow the same steps as you would to recover an email account.

Hopefully none of this will ever happen to you and if you take the precautions I’ve mentioned going forward it won’t.  I can tell you that my computers have never been hacked and I’ve been working on computers – mostly Macs – for over 20 years.  Besides the fact that hackers don’t seem to be interested in hacking Macs there are great preventions built in.  PC’s are also prevalent in offices, companies and government offices.  Hackers will get far more results with a PC. Therefore, if you own a PC please constantly update your anti-virus software and get total control over your Firewall.

If you take just one thing away from this post, it is to be vigilant and to always be on the look out.  Make preventing viruses and hacking a daily business practice of making art.

 

Email: What Not To Do

These are a few things you will want to avoid doing in email because they are either highly unprofessional or just downright annoying to your recipient.

DON’T USE ALL CAPITAL LETTERS – This is the equivalent of screaming and it’s very hard to read. It’s the number one complaint that I hear. It also usually says to me that the email sender doesn’t know what they are doing quite yet.

Don’t Say Anything on Email That You Wouldn’t Say In Person or On the Phone – It is the coward’s way out. Also remember that email can be saved and printed out. If it is deleted it can be retrieved from the server later. (I’m sure you’ve heard of cases of AOL pulling up an email from the deep dark past of a person in a court of law).

Don’t Send Flaming or Emotional Emails – Do Not ever forget that email is just words. Even the best punctuation cannot convey what body language or a voice on the phone can. Be very clear and concise. If you’re not sure how what you’re saying will be perceived then don’t send it at all. I’ve had emails misinterpreted and illicit “flamingly” negative responses. Think before you Click “Send”.

Don’t Discuss Confidential Information on an Email – As I said above, remember that it can be saved, printed, easily shared and hacked. Pick up the phone or arrange a meeting.

Don’t Click “Reply All” Unless Your Message is For Everyone – Take control of this. Make absolutely sure you are replying to the sender only. Otherwise, you’ll be annoying everyone else in the email group with an email that simply says something like “Thanks! I’ll be there.” Whey it’s not necessary to see that. The other mistake that is made is that a very personal response between the sender and the recipient is seen by all. Make sure it’s only seen by you and the sender.

Forwarding For the Sake of Forwarding – Maybe you think that all of your friends will think it’s cool and you just click on Forward without a message of any sort. I’ve had friends who I’ve had to remind repeatedly that I’m way to busy to look at every cartoon, cute photo, interesting quote or whatever (use your imagination) that they send me. Remember it’s not communicating. Communication is a discussion between two people. Forwarding is not a discussion.

Don’t Forward Chain Emails – These are emails that ask you to take an action and saying something like “If you don’t forward this to all of your friends bad luck will befall you.” Don’t fall for it. It will annoy everyone you send it to and it’s just not true.

Don’t Open an Old Email and Just Hit Reply – Make sure you change the subject pleeeaaasssee. Make sure the subject concurs with the text of an email. Perhaps you are looking for an old email address the only way to do it is to pull up an old email and then hit reply. I guarantee you that there is always a way to change the subject which means there is no excuse for not doing it.

Don’t Click Reply All and Then Write “Remove Me From This Email List” in the Subject – That’s so embarrassing for the sender and completely not necessary. At the bottom of a commercial email you can click “Unsubscribe” or Mark As SPAM in your email server or you can just send a nice note to the sender asking them not to send you group emails again. This can also hurt your reputation. Suppose some of the people on that email list are critics, jurors, etc? They will think that you are not a nice person and difficult to work with. You will also, most certainly, burn a bridge with the sender who you may want to continue communicating with.

Don’t Use Re: Re: RE: Too Much – if you just keep replying to an email going back and forth with someone it will just keep adding a RE:. Eliminate a few of these or change it if the content of the email has changed.

Don’t Leave the Subject Blank – This is extremely annoying because your recipient won’t know what the email is about. Service Providers can also mark an email with a blank subject as SPAM. 99.9% of the emails I receive have subjects but if they don’t and they are from someone I know, I usually assume their account has been hacked and delete it. Even if you just put “Hi” or “News” in the subject it helps but please be more creative and to the point than that.

Don’t Say “Urgent” or “Needs Immediate Attention” in the Subject – Especially if it doesn’t. Email Service Providers may also interpret this as SPAM.

Don’t Use a Really Long Subject – Keep it short and to the point. I had a friend who would do this when email first became widely used. She would write the entire email in the subject and leave the text area blank. I would miss most of what she said. Then she got more control over it but would put most of the email in the subject and then repeat it in the text area. I knew her and would laugh and pick up the phone. Imagine if I didn’t know her what my reaction would be? Either that the sender was really nuts or unprofessional and I’d delete it without opening it at all.

Don’t Use Texting Lingo – i.e. Ur or Gr8. First of all this can be cause for miscommunication. Not everyone knows what it means and it is, once again, highly unprofessional. I’ve asked senders not to do this repeatedly and on the third ask I usually block them.

Don’t Use Emoticons – These are those smiley faces or symbols that are fun but not to be used in a professional email.

3967_IconsExamples of Emoticons

One last thing I want to share with you can send emails to a group of people by using CC: or BCC:

BCC – Blind Carbon Copy is an email sent to multiple recipients who can’t see each others names and can’t respond to them. (They can respond to the original sender, however…that would be you). You might do this to discretely let somebody else in on a conversation, to send to an email list without sharing everybody’s email or involvement with everybody else or any other situation where you or a recipient might desire a bit of privacy.

CC:  – Carbon Copy – this is like Blind Carbon Copy only the recipients will be able to see and respond to everyone.

By the way, if you don’t have one already here are a few of our favorite email Service Providers.

Domain Associated Email – this is the best for professional use. Think of it this way – every time you send out an email you will be sending a free mini-ad for your website. It also looks far more impressive and professional. Most website hosting packages will come with a certain amount of domain related email addresses. If not you can certainly purchase one easily.

Gmail Gmail is email that’s intuitive, efficient, and useful. And maybe even fun and they give you 10GB of storage. I also find that creating folders is easy and their SPAM Filters are just right for me.

Yahoo Yahoo makes it easy to enjoy what matters most in your world. Not as easy to use but still widely popular

MSN – This used to be Hotmail. It’s good and far preferable to AOL.

AOL – America Online. I have always found the AOL interface to difficult and “antiquated” to use. In fact, I sent one of my clients an image that I’d edited carefully and AOL completely changed everything.

Overall I find Gmail to be the easiest to use of all of the Email Service Providers not associated with your domain name. You may choose to use an Email Service Provider for your personal email and a Domain Associated Email for your professional. This should make your life far easier and set you up for great online success!

 

 

Email: Doing Business Day to Day

I am assuming that by now you know how to use basic email. That you have a good server (such as Gmail, Yahoo, AOL, MSN, or an email attached to the domain of your website). You know how to compose, send, reply, forward, file, archive, etc. What you may not know is that there is an etiquette that you should keep in mind as you communicate for professional purposes – and it’s a good idea to keep them in mind for personal email as well. Some of what I tell you will apply to how you conduct yourself on Social Media as well.

Did you also know that some people spend up to two hours a day checking and responding to emails? Sometimes they just delete them because they are overwhelmed. Setting up the right systems and using the right protocols will ensure that you don’t become one of those people.

These guidelines should keep you organized and you will get results….

Set Up Different Accounts for Different Purposes – I have a personal and a business account. This is so that I don’t get confused and that I can take a day off and still interact with friends and family. It really makes a difference.

Set Up a Time of Day to Respond to Email and Social Media – the number one question I get from people just starting with email and especially Social Media is that they will be overwhelmed with the amount of time they will have to spend on it. Choosing a time of day that you check and respond to email and social media will keep you from being overwhelmed and you won’t spend as much time doing it.

Clear Your Inbox Daily – If you don’t you could easily become overwhelmed fast. Make sure that you take an action with every email that comes into your box as soon as possible. I set up files for emails I need to save or want to look at later. Most servers will have an option to create a file. You can usually find the ones that you don’t need to read without opening them. Click them and click on delete. Then find the ones that will need quick attention and read those. Lastly, go over the ones that you need to spend more time with. Your ultimate goal should always be an empty Inbox.

Check Your SPAM Folder – there is a folder somewhere in your email account that automatically stores all SPAM. All email servers now have SPAM Filters. Some are stronger than others and some allow you to determine how strong that filter is or to turn it off. Never-the-less always check the SPAM folder – at least once a day. You don’t want to miss an important email that was wrongly determined to be SPAM by your server.

NEVER/EVER Reply to SPAM – SPAM is usually sent through bulk email services or some kind of automated service. That means that they can track who opened the email, what they clicked on, where they’re from (in general terms) and more. Opening one SPAM means that you may suddenly see a lot more. SPAM may also have a virus attached that may automatically activate when you open it.

Compose a Signature – most email services will have a way for you to create an automatic signature. You should include your name, your website, blog and social networking pages. Some will actually have a way for you to insert the logo of the social networking platform and have it link to your page and some will allow you to insert images into your signature. Please do not include a street address or a phone number in your signature. You don’t want that to actually wind up in the email of someone you don’t know that well.

Use an Engaging Subject You always want the recipient of your emails to not only take action with your email but to open it and be excited about receiving it. Make sure that your email compels them to do just that. Use something engaging, funny and/or to the point.

Respond As Soon As Possible As I said in today’s world wide web – especially with smart phones – email senders will expect a quick response – usually within 24 hours. Don’t let an email go for more than 24 hours without taking some kind of action.

Keep Your Emails Short and To The Point – Again, in today’s world (the world wide web that is) attention spans are very short. Make sure that your email is direct. i.e. Dear Mr. Smith, I am writing to you because….” Especially if it’s a business person, curator, gallery director, grants manager, etc. If you do have to write a longish email try to keep your paragraphs short, to 3-5 sentences maximum. I know I don’t have to tell you that those sentences should not be run-on sentences. Use punctuation to break it up. If you’re not sure what to do, see my prior posts on grammar and punctuation.

Be Judicious About Punctuation – don’t use too many exclamation points or question marks. Doesn’t it look amateur and unprofessional???!!!

Use Spell Check – Always, always use spell check and then check it again yourself, especially if it’s an important email or stressful situation. Sometimes reading it out loud or to a friend helps to put it in perspective as well. Remember that computer spell checkers are not human beings.

Set Up Templates – If you find yourself answering the same question again and again you can use a template for an answer or a part of an answer. I usually compose the email in Microsoft Word (or another word processing program) and then I copy and paste it into an email. I customize it – adding the person’s name or changing some other detail.

Check Any Links That You Include Before Sending Them – imagine receiving an email with a link and when it’s clicked on takes you to a strange website or the link it just dead – it doesn’t open up anything. Wouldn’t that be frustrating? (Actually, I usually Google or Search for it on the internet. It’s an extra step that I have to take, however, and it can be annoying).

Write Something in the Text Area When You Send Attachments – I can’t tell you how many times I’ve gotten emails with attachments (even from commercial galleries) and nothing in the text area. I usually assume that it’s SPAM or their email has been hacked. It’s probably a press release but I can’t take that risk and I certainly can’t take the extra time to download and open a .doc (Microsoft Word) or a .pdf (Adobe Acrobat Reader). It’s cold and highly unappealing.

Make Sure That Your Attachments Load Quickly – When you do send attachments – let’s say it’s a curator asking for images or a resume or an artist statement – make sure they load quickly. If they are large files there should be a way for you to compress them. By the way, in most cases images should be 72dpi for sending on the internet. (See the first posts on this blog about Digital Imaging).

Make Sure Photos You Embed Into the Text Area of Your Email Load Quickly – there is nothing more annoying than sitting at your desk, with 5,000 other things to do, while the email takes forever to open up and load. Make sure that you are not sending a Camera Raw or 300dpi photo that is 21″ x 18″. It will surely take a while to overload and may even freeze the recipients computer completely.

Use Auto-responders – take a good look when you first set up your email account because some may have an auto-responder already set up. You want to disable it. Should you go on vacation or need to be away from your desk for a number of days, you will want to use this feature. You can say something like: “Thank you for contacting me. I am out of the studio and will be back on …you pick the date.”

In the next post I will cover the things that you shouldn’t do so please stay tuned!

Social Media: Email: Building an Effective Email List

So now that you understand email terminology and have decided to begin using a commercial email service you will need people to send those emails too. Building that list is easy and it will grow quickly if you make collecting emails a part of your daily business practice of making art. Here are some ideas of how to go about it….

First let’s talk about Content….

Create Remarkable Content – engage your readers to the point where they just can’t wait for your next email. That they will be on the edge of their seats. TIP: Remember that you are sending an email to one person, an audience of one. Address each recipient as if they’re receiving an email from a friend.

Keep Your Content Simple – make sure it’s easy to understand and that there is one direct message or call to action in every email. Also keep it visually simple as well. Your website should be visually simple too. Make sure they are visually compatible. TIP: Be specific and don’t worry about being cool, using texting language or emotions (those funny symbols like smiley faces). Spell things out, be clear and concise and you’re sure to watch your email list grow quickly.

Send Emails Regularly – Your email subscribers will expect to hear from you. That’s why they subscribed to your emails in the first place. Don’t worry about sending SPAM. If you are asking people to subscribe then you will not be sending SPAM no matter how frequently you send it. If you don’t send email enough you may lose people and you may actually get a lot of bounces from invalid or no longer used email addresses. Remember that you always want to keep your emails and your list fresh.

Use Short Engaging Subject Lines & Vary Them – write something that will make them want to open that email. The trick is to make it sound good without sounding like SPAM. Email servers are very cognizant about subjects and will make a quick judgment. You also want to excite your subscriber. Make it fun and make sure there is something cool for them just waiting inside that email.

Now let’s talk about ways that you can capture those email addresses….

A Form On Your Website – commercial email services such as Constant Contact will have code that you or your website designer can plug into your website. It will create a little box with the words “Join My Email List” above it. Most people just put this on the home page of their website. They are missing a huge opportunity. Make sure it’s on every reasonable page of your website and make it easy to see.

Build a Page On Your Website Specifically For Subscribing – that You can send people to specifically to sign up on your email list for use on your print materials, that you can link to on social media and more.

A Form On Your Blog – see above but…. You can use the same code on your blog that you used for your website. There is usually a way to put .html code into your blog instead of a straight post. You can also ask your designer to do this. Some commercial email services will have different formats for blogs. Take a look at them and be sure you are using the one that best meets your needs.

Sign Up Form – When you capture someone’s email you have an opportunity to ask a few other questions. Never ask more than three. Remember that this isn’t a survey. You are trying to find out what they’re interested in. You can ask what kinds of emails they want to receive. Events, Announcements, Press Releases or Newsletters or All of the Above. You can ask what kind of art they like and how they found you. Use your imagination here but don’t overwhelm or chase away a potential subscriber with questions that might seem too invasive.

Collecting Emails Offline – There is nothing like face-to-face interaction. You should carry a small notebook with you everywhere you go and write people’s emails in them. Commercial email services such as Constant Contact have APPS for your smart phone that enable you to collect emails on the spot.

Print Materials – put a “call to action” in all of your print materials. For example you can use this sentence in 10 point type on the back of your postcard at the bottom. Join my email list. Visit: http://www.theartist.com/email.html

Voice Mail Message – believe it or not this is very effective. Don’t forget that the phone is a very important means of communication. You can create a greeting that says something like this…

“Hello. You have reached The Artists Studio [Your Name]. Please leave your name, number and message after the beep and I will get back to you as soon as possible. By the way, have you joined my email list yet? If you leave your email address (specifying upper and lowercase letters) I will add you. Thanks for calling. Have a nice day!”

Encourage Forwarding & Sharing– besides creating remarkable content you can add incentives for subscribers who forward your email and get people to join your list. Such as a free epostcard of your work or a screensaver of your work. Also make sure that those buttons to share your email are in every commercial and day to day email that you send.

Create An Offer – you can create an epostcard or a screensaver and send it to everyone who joins your list. You can add this offer to the Join My Email List form on your website.

Create a QR Code – I’m sure you’ve seen this everywhere. It’s a funny looking symbol/square that when you scan it with your smart phone it will take you to a place for more information. You can create this code and have it link to that page on your website where you can capture emails. You can then use this symbol on all of your print publications, your website, emails and anywhere else a phone can scan. You can find plenty of websites that will generate them for free online.

Sample QR Code

Sample QR Code

Social Networking – Post an invitation to join your email list on your social networking pages from time to time with a link to that web page that you’ve created specially for capturing subscribers.

Pinterest – Speaking of Social Networking…Link Images in your Pinterest account to that page on your website that you created specially for capturing subscribers.

Statistics – Watch the statistics in your commercial email service. They will tell you things like who’s opening your emails, who’s forwarding your emails, what they clicked and where their from. They can tell you even more but that depends on the service you choose. This information will tell you how to create better, more engaging emails.

Always remember that a subscriber is giving you gold! They are giving you permission to email them in exchange for their privacy. Treat that person who is subscribing like a really trusted and precious friend. Communicate with them that way, keep their trust and, most of all, get them excited enough to take action.


TARGETING YOUR EMAIL LIST

WHO SHOULD BE ON IT

Viewers, Buyers and Collectors

Fellow Artists
(Note that other artists are connected to
all of the above and may forward your email to them).

Arts Professionals
curators, gallery owners, arts consultants, art dealers

Interior Designers & Architects

Corporate Art Buyers

Business and Professional Contacts
Arts Council Professionals, Arts Organizations, etc.

Centers of Influence
Mavens, Connectors, people who will forward your email sand spread the word about your work. These are people whose followers trust them emphatically because they are “arbiters of fashion, culture and/or taste.”


OUR FAVORITE EMAIL SERVICES

constantcontactwww.constantcontact.com

Free Trial lets you send emails to up to 10 contacts for 60 days
They are the most popular commercial email service
because they’re been doing it since 1999 and they offer
many options such as social media integration, paypal integration
and more.

mailchimpwww.mailchimp.com
Tip: Mail Chimp is free until you get 2000 contacts

Social Media: Email

Email is THE most important form of Social Media out there. It enables you to communicate with buyers and turn them into collectors. It is also an essential marketing tool for artists. You can create marketing emails to send to a bulk list that not only look beautiful but keep people interested in what you are doing. The next series of posts will focus on email.

Let’s start with a little bit of history first:
The earliest electronic mail (email) goes back to the beginning of the 1960’s. It was a simple text, black and white message that existed on the same computer. There was no internet or even networking capability within an organization or office then. It was a file that was “appended” with messages from one author to another who were using the same computer and the same file. By opening that file the user could read what others had appended to it.

The first actual email, resembling what we know today, was sent around 7:00pm in the autumn of 1971. It was a test created by a programming engineer who had been chosen by the U.S. Defense Department to create ARPAnet. ARPA net was a precursor to the internet that allowed people within the U.S. Defense Department to communicate with each other.

By the end of 1972 Tomlinson’s two email software packages had become an industry standard and he first used the @ symbol in an email address. When he was asked why he used the @ symbol he said “The ‘at’ sign just makes sense. The purpose of the ‘at’ sign indicated a unit price for example 10 items @ $2.99. I used the ‘at’ sign to indicate that the user was ‘at’ some other host rather than being local.”

Email has gone from the early days with black and white text only to the addition of a choice of fonts, colors and backgrounds. You an also add images, video, audio and links. You can even send an email that looks like a mini-version of your website.

So let’s address some terms that are commonly used in email:

Email Bombing
The intentional sending of large volumes of messages to a target address. The overloading of the target address can render it unusable and can even cause the email server (such as AOL or Gmail) to crash.

Email Bankruptcy/Email Fatigue
This is when the user falls behind on checking their email and becomes overloaded with information. Very often they wind up deleting a series of emails based on what’s in the subject, just to get rid of the bulk of it.

Email Spoofing
An email that looks like it’s coming directly to you from a trusted source such as your bank. There may be a link in it which is called Phishing (see below).

Flaming Email
This occurs when a person sends an email with angry or antagonistic content. The term is derived from the term incendiary to describe how heated discussions on email can get. A flaming email can almost literally leap off the screen right into your heart. Emails can be perceived as Flaming even when the sender didn’t intend it to be that way because body language and voice intonations are not present. There are ways of saying things like “Lol” (Laugh Out Loud) and :-) for a smiley face to indicate something funny or a joke. Please don’t use those in professional emails. Just be very aware of what the recipient might see in your email communication.

Phishing
An email spoof or message leading you to a website that asks for your information. The source may be a spoof that looks like a trusted source (such as your bank) saying that they need to update your information. Don’t fall for it! No bank of any worth would do that online. If you do fall for it you may be asked to submit your name, address, phone number and Social Security Number or Bank Account information. It’s the beginning of identity theft.

SPAM
Spam is unsolicited commercial (or bulk) email that is of no use to the spammer. The cost of email is minimal so spammers may send out millions of email messages each day. This can lead to information overload. Most email servers will have a spam filter. Make sure that it is on the lowest setting. The filters aren’t perfect and they can block an important email. Most emails will also have a spam folder or bulk mail folder. Make sure you check that daily to be sure you aren’t missing anything.

I want to give you a brief, entertaining fact about the use of the term SPAM just for fun.

The term SPAM originally came from the meat produced by Hormel Meat Packing Company in Austin, Minnesota. It was first produced in 1937. The President of the company at the time came up with a really tasty recipe for Spiced Ham. Thus the name SPAM. In the first year of production SPAM captured 18% of the market. By 2002 more than six billion cans of SPAM have been sold with 44,000 cans per hour coming out of the factory. This means that a can of SPAM is sold every 3.1 seconds. Unbelievable!

So how does Hormel feel about the use of SPAM to imply something so negative? Hormel’s “official” position is as follows:
“We do not object to the use of this slang term to describe Unsolicited Commercial Email, although we do object to the use of the word ‘spam’ as a trademark and to the use of our product image in association with that term. Also if the term is to be used, it should be used in all lower-case letters so to distinguish it from our trademark SPAM, which should be used with upper-case letters.”

Back to the serious. On December 16, 2003 George W. Bush signed the CANSPAM Act into Federal Law. This was the first law setting national standards for the sending of email. It requires the Federal Trade Commission to enforce it. I will discuss marketing and bulk emailing in another post but note that you should have a visible “Unsubscribe” button in all of your marketing emails. To boil down the rest of it into simple terms the CANSPAM Act states that those sending emails have to be honest and forbids the use of false header/footer information.

This should begin to help you understand the use of email and some basic terms. I’ll begin to address using email in your communications and marketing in the next post so stay tuned.